Decorating Den

Decorating-Den

Jane and Leland Jincks graduated from Newport High School but moved to the valley when they got married. Leland joined the State Police while Jane worked in advertising for State Farm Insurance. About 30 years ago Leland was offered the opportunity to transfer home to Newport and the Jincks have lived here ever since.

After 26 years of service Leland retired from the State Police and became a licensed general contractor. Fortunately, from day one an abundance of remodeling and installation jobs were waiting for him. That’s because Jane had already built a large interior decorating clientele from Pacific City to Florence, and as far east as Corvallis.

Jane purchased the Newport Decorating Den Interiors franchise in 1997. Because of the company’s national buying power, franchisees like Jane are able to provide complimentary interior design services for homeowners and businesses. Customers receive in-home consultation and only pay for the products and furnishings necessary to complete their projects. The company offers a wide array of name brand window, wall & floor coverings, upholstery, paint, furniture, countertops, lighting, bedding, and accessories.

“The best showroom is your living room,” explains Jane. “You don’t have to waste time running from store to store and it’s always best to look at samples in your own home’s natural lighting.” After an initial get acquainted meeting to understand a customer’s needs and preferences, Jane will come back with layouts, color boards and product samples. Then she coordinates the entire process including measuring, ordering and installation.

Jane laughs and points out that “installation is always easier when you have absolute confidence in the contractor.” Leland is a Certified Hunter Douglas Window Coverings Installer and has successfully completed hundreds of installation and remodeling jobs. “Our businesses kind of feed each other,” remarks Leland. “Her customers usually need installation and my remodeling customers love having access to a professional designer.”

“By this point we’ve both been in business long enough that about 80% of our work comes from previous customers and referrals,” says Jane. Although Leland and Jane are currently the sole employees of their companies, they each support a significant number of jobs by subcontracting to local tradesmen including plumbers, tile setters, electricians, painters, and flooring installers.

Since opening their businesses Leland and Jane have only had one bad year, 2013, which is when Jane suffered a brain aneurism. After collapsing, she was life-flighted to Portland. The operation was intricate and Jane faced a long arduous recovery that she still claims would not have been possible without Leland’s unwavering support. Looking at her today, you’d never know that it happened; in fact she’s back working fulltime. But to Jane, interior design isn’t just her job; it’s a process she thoroughly enjoys.

Jane and Leland admit that what they do in their spare time has changed dramatically, but not because of health. “We’re the grandparents that go to every game… with five grandkids playing multiple sports, that leaves almost no time for anything else, but we love it.”

Longtime Oregon Coast Bank customers, the Jincks seem to be on a first name basis with our entire Newport staff. Jane likes the convenience of paying her business bills with our online banking, but she still enjoys her visits to our office. The feeling is certainly mutual.

Jane and Leland are an example of entrepreneurs whose hard work has allowed them to create jobs for themselves and others in their home town. We consider ourselves lucky to be their bankers.

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Local Ocean Seafood

It may sound like an urban myth, but on several occasions foodies have actually flown into Newport Municipal Airport and taken a cab to the bayfront, just to enjoy a meal at Local Ocean Seafoods. Thanks to glowing reviews in Saveur, Oregon Business Magazine, Sunset, Alaskan Air Magazine, Miami Tribune, and even on NPR, Local Ocean Seafoods has truly become a destination restaurant.

The daughter of a commercial fisherman, Laura Anderson took somewhat of a circuitous route in becoming a restaurant owner. After graduating from Newport High School and Pacific Lutheran University, she worked in the Peace Corps and lived in Vietnam. Eventually she earned a graduate degree in Marine Resource Management at Oregon State University. How did she finance her education? “I worked in more restaurants than I can remember,” laughs Laura.

In 2002 Laura opened Local Ocean Seafoods as a fish wholesaler, primarily distributing seafood to Portland and Seattle. By 2005 the business had opened its doors to the public as a fish market with a deli. Within months, she realized that demand for the restaurant had already outgrown its capacity, so sidewalk seating was added. This year, in an effort to lower wait times, the restaurant was remodeled, adding an upstairs bar and additional seating.

Laura insists on absolute freshness. The restaurant’s seafood is literally served from boat to table. “We buy from more than 60 different vessels in Yaquina Bay and freshly fillet our fish on a daily basis,” she explains. In fact, local fishermen frequent the restaurant and it’s obvious that they enjoy interacting with the customers. “You could be eating lunch next to the guy that caught your fish that day,” says Laura.

Signature menu items include Roasted Garlic and Dungeness Crab Soup, a Crab Po’ Boy sandwich, Moqueca de Piexe (a Brazilian seafood stew) and an incredible Tuna Mignon – grilled bacon-wrapped albacore. At Local Ocean Seafoods even traditionally fried items, such as fish and chips, are instead grilled, often in a panko crust. The new upstairs bar serves nine draft beers and offers an extensive wine list with an emphasis on Northwest vintages. Fourteen featured wines are poured daily by the glass.

The restaurant’s bayfront location is essential to the experience. The view is of a working port. Laura often leads dock tours, allowing visiting groups to mingle with the fishermen. She also devotes time to maritime policy and serves on the state’s Fish and Wildlife Commission.

As Local Ocean Seafoods has grown, so has its workforce. Fifty permanent workers are part of the year round staff, which is augmented by 25 seasonal employees during peak months. Laura values staff longevity and strives to provide a competitive pay plan.

It’s a relatively short stroll down the bayfront from Local Ocean Seafoods to Oregon Coast Bank, and many of our bank employees frequent the restaurant. But the relationship is more extensive than that. “Oregon Coast Bank has financed our building, our parking lot, and our remodeling project,” mentions Laura. “It means a lot to me that they’re local and take the time to understand my business.”

Even after adding considerably more seating, there’s still a line in front of Local Ocean Seafoods on a daily basis. With her insistence on quality and absolute freshness, Laura has built a restaurant that deserves its accolades. It’s a great story of entrepreneurship, and as her bankers, we’re proud to have played a small part in it.

 

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Reino Randall

Reino-Randall

Since his dad was the head of the art department at Cal State Hayward, it’s easy to understand why Reino Randall was always building something as a child. As he grew up in the East Bay area he became fascinated by the fishing culture and liked to hang out by the docks.

Eventually a local fisherman asked Reino to build a deck box. Pleased with the result, the fisherman called a friend in the boatbuilding business and said “put this kid to work”. Decades later Reino still loves his craft.

Reino’s services are in demand from Santa Cruz to Alaska, but it’s Newport that he calls home. How he got here is another story. While working together on a project in Samoa, the late Barry Fisher, one of Newport’s most revered fishermen, took note of Reino’s talents. Barry, who could be blunt but extremely convincing, simply told Reino: “you need to come to Newport”. Eventually he agreed. Fifteen years later Reino realizes what a great choice he made.

Since everything must be custom fit and withstand the severity of the ocean, boat building is a craft that takes many years to master. Notice the perfect curves of the rebuilt oak gunnel and rail next to Reino’s arm in the picture above. From constructing an entire wheelhouse to replacing the planks on a hull, Reino does it all. Creativity is a must. Working around a boat’s plumbing, hydraulics and electrical systems means Reino’s designs must often change on the fly.

His woodwork on fishing vessels is considered yacht grade. For staterooms and bunks, Reino often chooses sapele, a semi-hardwood of African origin known for its beauty and stability in marine conditions. “I’ve had vessel owners tell me to build things so nice that their crew would rather just stay onboard when the boat is in port,” explains Reino.

Reino’s galley designs are somewhat of a hybrid between a luxury home and a commercial kitchen. “When a captain’s wife complains that this is nicer than our house, I know I’ve done a good job on their boat,” he says with a smile.

Ask him if he still likes his job and Reino will say “I can hardly wait for Monday to come around.” How long does he expect to continue as a boat builder? “I’m not planning to retire until they put me in a wet-lock box and dump me over the side.”

The boat builders who work the docks in Newport and Toledo are a close bunch. All are highly skilled independents, who sometimes compete for projects, but often work together as a team. “For the most part, we’ve stayed pretty busy over the last several years,” says Reino. That may be an understatement; he’s typically booked two years in advance.

Reino understands that a healthy local fishing industry means continual work for Oregon boat builders. “All the vessel owners I work for seem to get their financing from the same place – without Oregon Coast Bank I don’t know where we’d be.” In fact Reino believes so much in his local bank, that he’s also a stockholder.

What does Reino do in his spare time? The same thing he did as a child, he builds something, which is another reason he appreciates his bank. “I can spot a house I’d like to remodel, call Oregon Coast Bank, and close the deal within a week,” he says. “Where else can you do that?”

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True-Cut Engraving

True-Cut-Engraving

It may be the nature of the business, but Newport’s True-Cut Engraving certainly seems like an enjoyable place. “People come here to get something that will make someone happy,” explains Stephanie Brown, the company’s owner. “I get to be creative and please the customers… what could be better than that?”

Walk through True-Cut Engraving’s showroom, and the possibilities seem endless – trophies, plaques, ribbons, signs, mouse pads and medals. Need a name plate, rubber stamp, building dedication plaque or even a toasting flute for your wedding? True-Cut Engraving has them, and all can be laser cut with a custom message of your choice. If the showroom samples aren’t enough, look through the company’s 559 page specialty catalog with thousands of items, any of which can arrive in Newport by the next day for custom engraving.

Although her company “feels like the perfect fit for me”, Stephanie never even considered a career in the engraving business while growing up in Juneau, Alaska. Fueled by her passion for sailing, Stephanie moved to Newport at the age of 22. Soon she met a kindred spirit, Ken Brown, the manager of Newport’s family-owned Alan Brown Tire Center. Nine years ago they were married, and four and half years later came a daughter, Annabelle. Today, Annabelle also keeps an office at her mother’s business – a corner filled with paints, coloring books and puzzles. If you see a trophy in the showroom lying on its side, that’s just Annabelle giving it a “nap”.

It’s not only Annabelle that gets to do fun projects at True-Cut Engraving. The more challenging, the higher the level of creativity, the more Stephanie loves it. Her custom trophies for a cycling competition included actual bike parts mounted and engraved. Stephanie recently designed trophies for Newport High School film projects that included Oscar statuettes mounted with actual 35mm film and spools.

Although she’s in the showroom almost every business day, Stephanie realizes how important it is for her company that she stays active in the community. She’s a member of the Chamber of Commerce, the booster club and the local yacht club. “I guess it helps that I’m a compulsive organizer,” she explains.

Intentionally oblivious of the timing, Stephanie and Ken purchased the business in 2010, when much of the rest of the country seemed more interested in discussions of recession. The Browns, however, believed that hard work and outstanding customer service would make their new venture a success, and indeed it has. “Entrepreneurship has its advantages,” explains Stephanie. “I may be the sole employee, but my daughter can come with me to the office and my husband pitches in when I need his help and companionship. We’re often having so much fun that it doesn’t feel like a business.”

The Brown family and their tire stores have been longtime Oregon Coast Bank customers, so naturally when Stephanie and Ken purchased True-Cut Engraving, they brought their business accounts to our local Newport branch, where they’re recognized by name by practically our entire staff. Of course as a business itself, Oregon Coast Bank is frequently in need of True-Cut Engraving’s products and we highly recommend Stephanie’s creativity and service as well as the quality of her work.

Stephanie will tell you: “I love the business, but we also depend on its income.” In fact, it’s hundreds of companies like Stephanie’s, often as small as one employee, that are the backbone of our coastal economy. We salute their hard work and we’re honored to be their bankers.

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The Coffee House

The-Coffee-House

Her accent is obvious, but it’s her story that is even more fascinating. Judith Lingham grew up outside Melbourne, Australia, earned a degree in youth counseling and started her career working with homeless adolescents. About 14 years ago, while en route to London, she stopped in California for a three-day Disneyland vacation. During her visit to The Magic Kingdom she fell in love with America and the friendliness of the people she met. Quickly Judith cashed in her ticket to England and boarded a Greyhound bus to the San Francisco area.

Her goal was to open a coffee shop in Sausalito, but her budget was too small. Friends told her that prices were less along the Oregon coast, so she took a two-week trip looking for a business to buy. Finding one to her liking on Newport’s historic bayfront, she quickly remodeled it and opened The Coffee House in 1998.

Soon came a snowstorm that burst pipes in her back yard. As an Australian “I didn’t think going north would make it colder,” she laughs. But despite the setback she loved Newport, particularly the folks who lived there. “I felt very welcome,” she remembers. “Even if they weren’t buying coffee, people came in just to say hello.” They also told her that besides coffee she should be serving breakfast. Within a few months The Coffee House began offering a complete breakfast menu and word of her amazing big and fluffy omelets and homemade biscuits had spread.

With a line out the door during breakfast hours, adding a lunch menu was a natural progression. The Coffee House’s sandwiches are served on freshly baked focaccia bread and customers regularly request the recipe. The fish and chips also have a devoted following from visitors and locals alike.

Ask Judith what the best part of owning a restaurant is and she’ll say, “I love the customers, they always have a story.” Of course after sharing a little bit about themselves, customers inevitably want to know about Judith and her accent. Australians, like the British, are naturally reserved in talking about themselves. “I’ve had to learn that it’s okay to reveal a little about myself – I admire how open Americans can be.”

Operating a restaurant means a crises a day with equipment, deliveries and staff. “It’s a challenge to make it all work,” points out Judith. Judging from the constant stream of business and the smiles on customers’ faces, it’s apparent that The Coffee House is a well-run operation.

As an Australian, Judith naturally avoids the spotlight – in fact, we couldn’t even take her picture unless we promised to include her staff (that’s Judith with the curly hair close to the center). During the busy summer season, The Coffee House employs eleven and Judith gives them all the credit for the restaurant’s continued success.

Judith and The Coffee House have been customers of Oregon Coast Bank for more than 10 years. “They always recognize me by name and I always feel welcome,” she explains. “You can actually feel the difference at a local community bank.”

Fourteen years of success as an independent restaurateur is quite an accomplishment and Judith and her staff deserve an enormous amount of credit. Exceptional food and customer service have made The Coffee House a bayfront landmark – we’re proud to be their bankers and lucky enough to be within walking distance.

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Thompson’s Sanitary Service

Thompsons-Sanitary-Service

Back in 1963, Kenny and Agnes Thompson started Thompson’s Sanitary Service with three employees and two dump trucks. Their Newport home served as the office and all the bills were done by hand. Gradually the business grew.

A second generation, Bob and Sandi Thompson, purchased and began operating the business in 1982. One of their first investments was a computer for billing purposes. These days, Thompson’s Sanitary Service is owned and operated by a third generation, Ken Riley and Rob Thompson. Ken and Rob each started working for the company part time when they were boys, stacking newspaper, picking up litter and baling cardboard by hand.

When asked about their company’s success, Ken and Rob are quick to credit their 20 full time employees, some who have been with the company as long as 35 years. Ken and Rob, who each attended Oregon State University, certainly don’t fit the stereotype of quarreling third generation business owners. “I couldn’t think of a better partner,” says Ken. “That’s exactly how I feel,” adds Rob. “My weaknesses tend to be his strengths, and vice versa.”

Today, with 13 garbage trucks, Thompson’s Sanitary Service picks up residential and commercial garbage and recycling in Newport and the near vicinity, and then hauls it to the Willamette Valley and Portland for disposal and recycling.

“In the old days we basically just hauled stuff,” points out Rob. “Now, educating people about recycling opportunities has become a huge part of our job.” The Oregon Department of Environmental Quality establishes recycling goals for different regions of the state. “The waste shed that includes our service area is performing far ahead of DEQ’s goals,” explains Ken. “Our customers have done a great job of embracing recycling and as a company we’ve been able to provide the right services.”

In 2004 Thompson’s Sanitary Service began offering co-mingled curbside recycling, which allows customers to recycle a long list of items simply by placing them in one large, easy to roll, recycling cart. Almost immediately the number of homes recycling jumped from 700 to more than 2000, more than doubling the tonnage recycled each week.

The company provides its customers with simplified instructions for recycling a myriad of different items. It also participates in partnerships such as the PUD Fridge/Freezer Pickup Program and unique environmental services including battery, crayon and fishing net recycling.

“Grandpa taught us the importance of giving back to the community,” explains Ken. Thompson’s Sanitary Service is directly involved in a variety of volunteer community activities including SOLV Oregon River and Beach Cleanups, Oregon Refuse and Recycling Association, Newport High School Boosters, Sam Case/Newport Intermediate Boosters, Newport High School Baseball and Track, Central Coast Soccer Association, Rotary Club of Newport, Newport Chamber of Commerce, Lincoln County Children’s Advocacy Relay for Life, CAN Cancer and Lincoln County Food Share.

Ken and Rob also talk enthusiastically about what a great city Newport is to live in. “We’ve had the chance to travel across the country and we both feel this is the perfect place to raise our families,” points out Ken.

Peek into the cab of any Thompson garbage truck and you’ll see an onboard computer. In recent years the company has been at the forefront of its industry in embracing technology to increase efficiency, which is one of the reasons Thompson’s Sanitary Service does all of its banking with Oregon Coast Bank. “The bank’s IT department helped us develop a system allowing us to scan and deposit checks in our office while simultaneously posting credits to our customers’ accounts,” explains Rob. “I’m also able to manage our accounts anytime from anywhere just by using my iPad or laptop.”

 

At Oregon Coast Bank we can’t help but admire how Ken and Rob have enthusiastically supported and implemented a wide variety of recycling programs that have made our community a better place, not just today, but for generations to come.

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Troyers Marine Supply

Troyers-Marine-Supply

Sometimes the phone will ring at 4:30 in the morning. The voice may be thousands of miles away. But when commercial fishing boats call Troyer’s Marine Supply in Newport for parts or gear, they need it immediately.

“Boats call us from Alaska to the tip of South America”, explains Ed Troyer. “If we don’t have what they need in stock, we’ll source it and even ship by air freight. Our number one job is to keep ‘em fishing.”

Ed’s dad, Bruce, started Troyer’s Marine Supply 35 years ago. His mom, Phyllis, still helps with the books. During his high school and college years, Ed worked on commercial fishing boats. After graduating from Linfield College in 1981, he joined the family business.

Shipping survival suits to Russian Krill fishermen trawling South American waters. Supplying line to the real life vessels chronicled in TV’s The Deadliest Catch. It’s rarely a dull day at Troyer’s Marine Supply.

“Think of how many parts there are in a car, then multiply by 10,” laughs Ed. “That’s about how much gear a commercial vessel needs.” Troyer’s Marine Supply sells floats, hydraulics, plumbing fittings, rope, netting, motors, bearings, paint, rain gear… an almost endless list. The company’s veteran salesmen source items from more than 200 catalogs. Troyer’s also repairs pumps, hydraulics and motors.

Troyer’s has four employees. Salesmen Dave Thalman and Bill Ludwig have each been with the company for more than 20 years. “They have an almost encyclopedic knowledge of fishing gear,” explains Ed. “That’s something you only learn through experience.”

Ed and his wife, Diane, are raising two children, cattle and deer on a 100+ acre farm in Siletz. He volunteers as a youth soccer, baseball and basketball coach. There’s nothing fancy about his office, in fact his desk is surrounded by gear. There is, however, one advantage to an office perched over Yaquina Bay; you just can’t beat the view.

It’s less than a block walk for Ed to visit his bankers at Oregon Coast Bank. He’s worked with them for many years on business accounts, family accounts, even his home mortgage. But Ed also realizes how much time Oregon Coast Bank online banking saves him. His company’s bank statements integrate directly with his accounting software. He pays his bills online. He’ll even check his balance using his cell phone.

Drive past Troyer’s Marine Supply and you’d never imagine that at that very moment they could be rushing gear to a vessel a continent away. More importantly, the company has been an essential supplier to our local fishing industry for 35 years. We salute them and we’re proud to be their bankers.

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Schones Chiropractic

Schones-Chiropractic

Paul Schones’ grandfather is a fisherman, so is his dad, in fact Schones family members have fished commercially in the area for more than 32 years. But at the tender age of 12, Paul spoke with an uncle who had recently graduated from a chiropractic college and decided that someday he’d become a chiropractic physician too.

While attending Newport High School, Paul had the opportunity to work in Dr. Dennis Brittain’s Newport chiropractic clinic. That experience made him even more determined to become a chiropractor himself. After four years at the University of Oregon and another four years at Southern California University of Health Sciences, he received his doctorate.

While working at a chiropractic clinic in Pasadena, California, Paul received an offer from Dr. Brittain to come home to Newport, join the practice and eventually purchase it. After much thought, he accepted. One year later, in 2007, Paul and his wife Christi did in fact purchase the practice.

The Schones make a great team. Paul cares for a full slate of patients each day while Christi handles all of the bookkeeping. An additional two staff members keep the offices running smoothly. Schones Chiropractic’s Newport office is open Monday through Friday and their Waldport office is open two half days a week.

Patients initially visit Schones Chiropractic for a wide variety of reasons including back pain, joint pain and rehabilitation from injuries, but they soon discover Dr. Shones’ holistic approach to wellness, which often includes practical advice regarding diet and exercise. “People typically come into our office in pain. To be able to send them home smiling and laughing is very rewarding,” explains Dr. Schones. “I just love helping people get better.”

With five children ages 11, 9, 7, 5 and 3, it’s hard to imagine that Paul and Christi have time for anything but their family and business. Yet Paul finds time to be the worship leader at South Beach Church and serve as the team physician for Newport High School football and track. He also volunteers his professional services each year at the Newport Marathon.

Looking back, Paul candidly admits that when he left Newport High School, the last place he envisioned owning a chiropractic practice was in Newport. “When you get away for awhile, you start to realize what a special place our home town is. Christi and I truly appreciate the beauty of the area, the pace of life, and having the good fortune to be around people we grew up with. It’s also great to be able to raise our family with our parents and grandparents close by.”

Dr. Schones is also very appreciative of his community bank. “When we first talked to Oregon Coast Bank about buying the practice, we had very few assets and a lot of liabilities in the form of student loans. They gave us the loan based on our character and business plan – I doubt very many other banks would have done the same.”

As their practice has grown, the Schones have made good use of their Oregon Coast Bank line of credit and find it convenient to be able to manage their personal and business accounts online, even when they travel. The bank also provided the mortgage when the Schones bought their Toledo home. “Someday we hope to purchase a commercial building to house our growing practice,” adds Paul. “I’m sure it will be Oregon Coast Bank that helps us reach that goal.”

Because of the employment and economic vitality they provide, family-owned businesses like Schones Chiropractic are essential to our local communities. If you’re doing business on the Oregon Coast, we’d like to be doing business with you.

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Oregon Coastal Cutters

Oregon-Coastal-Cutters-(2)

Growing up in his family’s grocery store, Eric Clark learned the business at an early age. He started by cleaning the meat department and eventually was given the responsibility of wrapping meat. Eric learned everything he could from seven meat managers and then attended meat cutting school to learn even more.

In 1990 Eric made a great decision, marrying Cindi who he had grown up with in Waldport. In 2007 the couple made another terrific decision, opening Oregon Coastal Cutters, which has thrived offering custom meat cutting, smoking, mobile slaughtering and retail meat sales in South Beach.

Today Oregon Coastal Cutters butchers an average of about 350 animals a year, including cows, pigs, elk, deer, llamas, bears, lamb and antelope. On the road at least once a week, Eric typically slaughters six to eight animals in a day. After a few days of butchering, the fresh meat is available for the farmers to pick up. Hunting seasons are particularly busy times – Cindi jokes “we put a cot in the back room.” Hunters’ favorites include smoked meats, summer sausage, beer brats, polish sausage, teriyaki sticks, jerky and pepperoni.

The Clarks have raised two boys and credit Oregon Coastal Cutters for giving them the scheduling flexibility to be an active part of their kids’ endeavors. Cindi has also continued to serve as a substitute aide for the local school district. In Eric’s words: “Owning this business allows us to be a part of the community.” The Clarks are active in the Yachats Lions Club, the 4-H Auction and the Oregon Hunters Association. Eric is the current President of the Waldport Booster Club.

Most of the year, Oregon Coastal Cutters is a two-person operation. Eric slaughters and cuts, Cindi wraps meats and does the books, and they share in the smoking responsibilities. Things get so busy during hunting seasons that each year Oregon Coastal Cutters hires additional help to assist in handling the load.

It was the need to upgrade to a more efficient mobile meat cutting truck that brought Eric and Cindi to Oregon Coast Bank. “They were amazing – everything happened in three days,” remembers Eric. The logistics and automotive paperwork were handled by Oregon Coast Bank board member Dick Murry at his South Beach family dealership, Toby Murry Motors. “The bank told us they’d treat us like fishermen,” laughs Eric. “That meant we could choose when and how much our payments would be during different months of the year – which is extremely important when your business is cyclical like ours.”

If you farm or hunt, you’ve probably already experienced the quality of Oregon Coastal Cutters’ meats. If you haven’t, stop in and try their retail offerings. Aside from producing exceptional quality meat, Eric and Cindi are an example of entrepreneurs succeeding in business because of their hard work and commitment to the community. We’re proud to serve as their bankers.

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Mo’s

Mos

For more than 65 years, Mo’s restaurants have been virtually synonymous with the Oregon coast. The story begins in 1940, when Mohava (Mo) Niemi and her dad bought the Bay Haven Inn on Newport’s bayfront. In 1946 they sold the tavern and Mo joined her friend Freddie Kent to start a café called “Freddie & Mo’s”. A few years later when Freddie became ill, Mo purchased her friend’s interest in the café and shortened the name to the now familiar “Mo’s”.

Call her crusty and colorful, but Mo had a big heart and a warm hospitable personality. The “little joint on the waterfront” soon became popular with the local fishermen, generations of visitors, even the rich and famous including Governor Tom McCall, Senator Robert Kennedy, Senator Mark Hatfield, Paul Harvey, Henry Fonda, Paul Newman and Joanne Woodward, to name just a few.

Because the line of people waiting for tables typically spilled out the front door, Mo’s Annex was added in 1968, right across the street. In 1972 Mo’s West at Devil’s Punchbowl in Otter Rock opened. By the late 70’s and early 80’s, Mo’s had expanded to Lincoln City overlooking Siletz Bay, Florence on the Siuslaw River, and to Cannon Beach overlooking the ocean.

Although she didn’t receive her first paycheck until the age of 12, Cindy McEntee began working at her grandmother’s restaurant at a much earlier age. Within months after Cindy’s high school graduation, Mo hired a business education company to teach her granddaughter restaurant management. That arrangement lasted just a short time until Mo decided that she should be the one to teach Cindy the ropes.

Cindy continues to head the family business today, but with a great deal of help from her daughter Gabrielle and son Dylan, who each began working at Mo’s part time while in high school and then returned upon graduating from college. It’s interesting to note that the Newport BPW voted Mo as “Business Professional Woman of the Year” in 1978, while Cindy received the same award in 1987 and Gabrielle in 2005.

A big part of Mo’s family atmosphere is the company’s family of employees, which averages 90 during peak times. With benefits including a retirement plan, major medical insurance and HSAs, Mo’s employees tend to be long term; some have been with the company for more than 30 years.

While classics like fish & chips and oyster shooters remain best sellers, Mo’s has updated their menu in recent years, adding popular items like fish tacos, seafood cioppino and shrimp skewers alfredo. It is however Mo’s Clam Chowder that has made the restaurant famous. Mo’s Chowder Factory produces about a half million pounds of the delectable concoction a year, some for the restaurants, some which is shipped as fresh chowder base (for grocery stores, internet sales and charitable fundraisers) and some which is canned and sold in grocery stores throughout the west. The company also offers its own cans of troll-caught albacore tuna.

When asked the secret of Mo’s success, Cindy, Gabrielle and Dylan mention three of the family’s business philosophies. “Our customers know what to expect, we take very good care of them and we keep our prices low.” They also point out the importance of being active in the local community. Among her many civic contributions, Cindy has served on the Newport Urban Development Committee, the Chamber Board, the original Performing Art Center Board and spent almost eight years on the city council. Gabrielle served on the Children’s Advocacy board, was active in Altrusa International, and is the current chairman of the Destination Newport Committee. Dylan has been a Boy Scout leader and continues to coach youth baseball, softball and basketball.

Cindy is also a founding member of Oregon Coast Bank’s Board of Directors and currently serves as chairperson. With accounts for their restaurants, commercial real estate holdings and families, we have the pleasure of seeing Cindy, Gabrielle and Dylan quite often. However as Oregon Coast Bank has offered more and more electronic capabilities, Mo’s has been an early adapter. Using iPhones, iPads and their laptops, Cindy, Gabrielle and Dylan are able to manage their finances remotely, even during vacations abroad.

If you’ve never experienced Mo’s, we urge you to – the restaurant’s success is for good reason. But what will impress you most is the hospitality, for in Mo’s own words, “You’re a stranger here but once”.

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