Bayshore Dental Images

Bayshore-Dental-Images

His father operated a dental lab in Eugene, so choosing to become a dentist came somewhat naturally to Grant Williams. After graduating from OHSU School of Dentistry, he first practiced in Roseburg before purchasing a practice in the Portland area in 1988.

It was in 1997 that Grant and his wife, Francine, purchased a home in Neskowin, which they visited almost every weekend. Thoroughly enjoying their low-stress life on the coast, and becoming more and more resentful of Portland area traffic, they decided to move to the coast full time in 2000.

Initially, Dr. Williams commuted to McMinnville and Salem to practice, but in January 2002 he opened a new dental office on Brooten Road, just off Highway 101, in Pacific City. Today Bayshore Dental Images, LLC serves more than 1800 active patients from Depoe Bay to Garibaldi.

“They tell me I don’t hurt them,” laughs Dr. Williams, but in reality patient comfort is a big factor in the success of any dental practice. Bayshore Dental Images offers oral conscious sedation, Nitrous Oxide, as well as local anesthetics, so even the most nervous patients can undergo dental procedures without fear of pain.

Often it’s a bad dental experience as a child which leads a person to put off dental care for years, until they develop serious problems. Unfortunately gum disease can lead to other serious medical issues including stroke, kidney problems, even heart attacks.

It’s not unusual for a person embarrassed about the condition of their teeth to try and avoid smiling, or to even speak with a hand in front of their mouth. “I’ll tell them you’ve taken the first step – you’re here now and you’re doing it for your health,” explains Dr. Williams. “The best part of my job is helping people feel better about themselves.”

With a staff of five, Bayshore Dental Images offers a full range of dental services including cleanings, digital x-rays, fillings, crowns, root canals, implants, bridges, extractions, veneers, and dentures. The staff prides itself on being active in the community and recently received first place in the commercial division for their float in the Dory Days Parade.

Grant and Francine, who have four children and four grandchildren between them, now reside in Pacific City where they enjoy fishing and running their dogs on the beach.

Bayshore Dental Images has been a customer of our Oregon Coast Bank Pacific City office for more than a decade. They take advantage of our credit card processing services and even scan checks in their own office for automatic deposit. Dr. Williams uses Oregon Coast Bank online banking when he travels and enjoys the convenience of being able to pay bills electronically.

Looking back on his choice of careers, Dr. Williams readily says “yes, I’d do it all again.” But it’s very apparent that his contentment has a lot to do with his environment. He simply loves living on the coast.

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Neskowin Beach Golf Course

Neskowin-Beach-Golf-Course

For 83 years generations of residents and visitors have learned to play golf on the historic 9-hole course in Neskowin Village. But it always has meant much more to the community. The large, park-like, open space contributes to the atmosphere and desirability of the village.

The course plays an important role in the local economy. For about seven months each year it has attracted golfers and their families to enjoy everything the small coastal community has to offer. But each winter brings the annual flooding, when the geese and elk always outnumber the golfers.

Neskowin Beach Golf Course was designed by Ercel Kay in 1932. Using horse-drawn implements, Kay carved the fairways and greens to preserve the natural contours of the land. Yes, that is Jack Benny in the 1959 photo above, posing with Helen Dettweiler, one of the founders of the Ladies Professional Golf Association, who often taught lessons at the course. Benny is said to have shot an 84 when he visited Neskowin Beach.

Last September, after the regular Tuesday evening tournament, Neskowin Beach Golf Course’s longtime owner announced to the local players that he wouldn’t be reopening the course in the spring. Nor was he planning on selling the business.

Tom Eaton and Cathleen Callahan both had roots in Neskowin since their childhoods. That’s Cathleen’s grandmother posing on the seventh tee 75 years ago in the photo on the right above. Now part-time residents, Tom and Cathleen knew that something had to be done so that future generations could enjoy the course as much as they had.

Tom emailed eight neighbors, inviting them to come to their home to discuss what could be done. 31 people showed up. The consensus was that the course was “the heart and soul of Neskowin”. It had to be saved. A volunteer committee was formed to explore the viability of various options.

Several months passed as the group looked for a buyer or partner that could help them achieve their goal. With none found, the group began negotiations with the course owner, Tom Clark. Clark agreed to sell to the community. In early May a new non-profit corporation, Neskowin Beach Golf Course, Inc., entered into a lease/purchase agreement with Clark.

The volunteer board of directors estimated that a million dollars would eventually have to be raised to cover both the purchase price and annual operating expenses. Knowing that some would contribute more, and some less, the committee’s goal became “200 families, each contributing $5000”. With 1,450 homeowners in the Neskowin area, they felt the goal was attainable.

Operating entirely through volunteer labor, the course was readied for its annual spring opening. The entire community was invited to the May 24th event and more than 220 people attended to learn how they could help. Contributors were offered various membership options with affordable annual dues in future years.

The initial fundraising went well. On July 13th, the committee exercised their purchase option and the non-profit corporation now owns the property. Within two months, they had raised more than $400,000. The course is now more popular than ever – over 1500 rounds a month are being played.

Lyle Rowland, a retired high school teacher and golf coach, leads a group of eight volunteers maintaining the course. His wife, Pam, has organized eight other volunteers to operate the historic clubhouse. Local families and businesses have donated materials and labor to return the course to pristine condition. The committee plans to hire a manager and grounds crew for future seasons, but community volunteers will always play a big role.

One of the goals of Neskowin Beach Golf Course, Inc. is that the property can be enjoyed by the entire community, including non-golfers. Free movie nights are now held weekly on the first tee (see photo above). A disc golf tournament was a sellout. A croquet tournament and nature walks are now in the planning stages. The committee is even considering how the property can be used for birders in the off-season, perhaps providing coffee and soup in the clubhouse.

At Oregon Coast Bank, we’re honored that Neskowin Beach Golf Course, Inc. opened their accounts at our Pacific City office. It’s been great to see Neskowin band together to save such an important community asset. Their business plan is solid. The many volunteers deserve a great deal of credit.

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Griffin House

Griffin-House

l admit it, I sniffed. But when I walked into the Griffin House in Tillamook, it didn’t smell like a nursing home, nor did it look like one. At first glance you’d call it a very nice, large, family home.

Now in its third year of operations, the Griffin House Residential Care Facility currently has a waiting list. Watch the happy residents interacting with the staff and you can see why. But to understand the Griffin House, you need to first understand its owners, Ron and Sharon Griffin. And that’s quite a story in itself.

Sharon was raised just up the road in Bay City. When her family moved to Central Washington, she met Ron in high school. In 1972 Sharon and Ron followed their hearts and moved to Tillamook. She worked in healthcare. He worked at a mill and in the woods falling timber for eight years.

After rupturing two discs in his back, Ron was retrained through Portland Community College to build airplane parts. That led to a job with Kenmore Air Harbor in Washington. After two years, the couple missed Tillamook so much that they decided to move back. Kenmore asked Ron if he would be willing to continue building airplane parts at his home. He was, and 28 years later he’s still doing it.

In 1994, the Griffins purchased Hush Salon & Spa in Tillamook, a business that they still own and currently employs seven. Sharon continued to work in healthcare and eventually served as a professional fiduciary, representing and advocating for seniors.

Things went downhill in 2004 when Ron was diagnosed with a brain tumor. As the situation continued to deteriorate, Sharon saw a television news program showing state-of-the-art brain tumor surgery at Cedars Sinai Medical Center in Los Angeles. Ron was initially turned down for the surgery, but Sharon persisted. After dozens of calls, he was finally accepted and the surgery saved his life. How did Sharon do it? By promising to bring the hospital’s phone receptionist a block of Tillamook cheese.

Amazingly, Sharon is also a brain tumor survivor. In both 1979 and 1987, she underwent successful surgeries in Portland to remove her brain tumors.

As a professional fiduciary, Sharon often had to find residential care centers for her clients. In some cases, facilities were not available locally that she felt comfortable recommending. Ron and Sharon discussed the situation for several years, and then decided to open a care facility of their own.

The Griffin House provides short term, intermediate term, and long term care for residents requiring assistance with daily living. The staff of 18 includes an RN, LPN and a chef serving restaurant quality meals. Most of the residents enjoy frequent “field trips” as they travel in the Griffin House van to shopping and activities.

Developing a 6000 square foot, 13-bed residential care facility is an expensive investment, and after a couple of years of operations Ron and Sharon realized that they would need long term financing. Thinking that a community bank would be their best option, they contacted Rose Wharton at Oregon Coast Bank.

“They couldn’t have been more helpful,” explains Sharon. “Fred, Oregon Coast Bank’s president, actually visited us, sat down on the couch, listened, and said that they’d make the loan,” remembers Ron. “Could you imagine the president of a chain bank ever doing that?”

“Our goal was to provide a family feel and the warmth of home while still delivering high quality care,” explains Ron. “But it’s the residents who have changed us.” “I actually look forward to coming to work each morning,” says Sharon. “Our residents are good people and it’s an absolute blessing to help them.” “We had Christmas dinner here,” adds Ron. “It does feel like family.”

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Bill & Ginger Slavens

Head east of Beaver, just about where Moon Creek meets the Nestucca, and you’ll find Bill and Ginger Slavens’ dairy farm. Bill was born and raised three miles down the road. Ginger grew up on a dairy in Cloverdale. They met at Nestucca High School and married 40 years ago.

Bill became an electrician and Ginger started at the Post Office. Three years later they were able to buy their original 48-acres through a Young Farmers Incentive Program government loan. The barn had to be retrofitted and new equipment was added for dairy farming.

Making the payments was a struggle. Essentially, Bill and Ginger had added the full responsibilities of operating a dairy on top of their other jobs. “A lot of people said we wouldn’t be able to do it,” remembers Bill. “That gave us even more motivation to succeed.”

To support the farm, Bill continued to work as an electrician for 20 years. Ginger continued to work for the Post Office for 35 years. As hard as they worked, they still agree that “buying the farm was a good move”.

These days they also own an additional 28 acres down the road and lease two other parcels. A fulltime employee was hired a few years back to help with the workload. With about 125 cows to be milked and an additional 125 of “young stock” to be taken care of, running the dairy makes for a long day. “The alarm clock goes off at 3:50 am,” laughs Bill.

“We have a sense of pride in the product we produce,” explains Ginger. As members of the Tillamook County Creamery Association, the Slavens’ dairy farm can continue to grow, knowing they have a stable market for their milk.

Bill and Ginger both agree: “a dairy farm is the best place in the world to raise four boys.” Their sons Tucker, Caleb, Tanner and Lucas each acquired a strong work ethic growing up on the farm. “They learned if they wanted something, they’d have to bust butt to earn it,” says Bill. “That may be why they’ve all paid off their college loans and have successful careers,” adds Ginger.

A few years back, Bill and Ginger visited Rose Wharton at our Oregon Coast Bank Pacific City office, to arrange the financing for a new home that Tucker and his wife Angie wanted to build on a corner of the family’s 28-acre parcel. Obtaining a building permit on agriculturally zoned land is difficult, but since the property had had a previous dwelling, permission was eventually granted by the county.

Fortunately, obtaining the construction loan and ultimately the permanent financing from Oregon Coast Bank was a much faster process. “They knew us and we knew them,” explains Bill. “They made us feel like family,” adds Ginger.

It’s a beautiful home. Tucker milled, cured, cut and stained much of the lumber himself, and you won’t find a knot in it. It took several years to finish, but like his parents, Tucker understood that building your dream is worth the hard work.

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Midway Dairy

Midway-Dairy

Karl Hale grew up on a farm, learning to milk with a bucket and stool. Thirty-seven years ago, Karl and his wife Donna brought their family north to operate a 73 acre dairy near Cloverdale. Back then, getting 50 pounds of milk a day from a cow was considered excellent. These days, Midway Dairy has increased the production of their cows by more than 50%, becoming a nationally known breeder of Holsteins in the process.

Today, Midway Dairy is a much larger operation. Through acquisitions, the farm’s footprint has increased to 191 acres. Two additional pieces of land are leased. About 300 cows are milked each day, with an additional 450 of “young stock” to be cared for.

Now in his seventies, Karl claims to be “slowing down”, yet he still actively runs the operation. As business owners, the Hales are fortunate. Their children Steven and Kara each decided to make the family dairy their career. A third child, Kevin, works at the Tillamook County Creamery Association, of which Midway Dairy is a member.

It’s not that the kids didn’t have options. Steven was the valedictorian of his high school class and Kara studied Dairy Science at Oregon State University. Having additional family members to manage the farm is a big advantage. “One of us can be here at all times,” explains Steven.

An additional five fulltime employees are needed to operate the farm, one of which has been with Midway Dairy for more than a dozen years. There are now six dwellings on the property –Karl and Donna’s original farmhouse, Steven’s home, Kara’s home, and three houses for the staff.

The magazine “Holstein World” is considered the bible of the industry. So when a Midway Dairy cow made the cover in 2010, it brought valuable exposure to the operation. “We just sold a cow to Iowa,” says Karl. “We’ve worked hard at it, but Midway Dairy has become a respected bloodline.”

“You have to like what you milk,” points out Kara. The Hales have actually set aside a portion of family property where they have buried some of their favorites, including a cow that Kara raised which produced more than 400,000 pounds of milk before retirement.

The Hales appreciate the beauty of the farm and the recreational opportunities it offers. “We‘re right on the Nestucca, with ducks in the fields, deer and elk in the yard, and trout in the pond,” says Karl. “That’s not a bad way to live.”

What may set Midway Dairy apart is the Hales’ willingness to invest in dairy technology. The milking parlor is a high-tech marvel. Each cow wears a transponder which connects to computers in the dairy office. That information can also be monitored through their smartphones or iPads.

“We watch what every cow does every day,” explains Kara who spearheaded the project. “We’re not just measuring a cow’s output; we’re watching all of its activity, including rumination.” Using microphones in the transponders, the program monitors how often each cow chews its cud. “That helps us optimize feed,” says Kara. “For breeding purposes, we can even project when a cow will be in heat.”

The Hales have made their investments in dairy technology with the support of Rose Wharton, the manager of our Oregon Coast Bank Pacific City office. “We’re not just a number, Rose knows us and our operation,” explains Karl. Besides their personal accounts, the Hales utilize an Oregon Coast Bank credit line for Midway Dairy. The bank also recently financed a line of Jersey cows that Kara has invested in.

When it comes to evaluating the cost of dairy technology, the Hales are pragmatic. “Yes it’s expensive, but we’re raising productivity and cutting our maintenance costs in half,” explains Karl. They also know the value of maintaining a healthy herd. As Kara says: “every cow counts.”

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Yellow Dog Espresso

Yellow-Dog-Espresso

Drive into Hebo and you’ll usually find a line at both windows of Yellow Dog Espresso. The business, which will soon celebrate its seventh year, has built a devoted customer base of locals and frequent visitors. In fact it’s not unusual for a Yellow Dog Espresso customer to stop by every day, sometimes more than once.

Yellow Dog Espresso is a labor of love for it’s owner, Tori Schrock. Born in Tillamook and raised in Beaver, Tori left the area for about 10 years after graduating from Nestucca High School. Working in restaurants in Seattle, San Francisco, New Orleans and New York City, she thoroughly learned the business.

Missing her family and the beauty of the Northwest, Tori decided to move back home in 2004. Soon she had purchased approximately an acre of land right on Highway 101. After her father brought water and power lines to the property, a 10’ x 16’ drive-thru was constructed. Picnic tables were added to the park like setting.

It was Tori’s mom who came up with the name Yellow Dog Espresso, a tribute to Hank, the family’s beloved lab. When Hank passed away, it was a new yellow lab, Oscar, who became Tori’s constant companion.

“Creating concoctions is what I like to do,” explains Tori. “I find it very rewarding to work with flavors.” All of Yellow Dog Espresso’s smoothies are made with real fruit including peaches, raspberries, strawberries, pineapples, bananas and seasonal berries. “Our customers appreciate having a beverage with nutritional value,” says Tori. Also popular is a refreshing spritzer made from homemade lemonade, raspberries and seltzer. The company’s house coffee, Yellow Dog Blend, is a special roast from Cascade Estates in Eugene. Homemade breakfast sandwiches and burritos are made from scratch each morning. Tori’s mom does most of the baking on the premises and customers enjoy a rotating menu of scones, muffins, coffee cakes, brownies and cookie bars.

Asked why her business has grown each year in such a competitive industry, Tori quickly credits her family. Her mom works regular shifts, and when the grass gets too high her dad shows up to mow the lawn. “Sometimes my brother will drive by, see how busy we are, and come in the kitchen to help out,” she explains.

Tori has known Rose Wharton, manager of our Oregon Coast Bank Pacific City office, since she was in grade school. So when she opened her business, she knew exactly who to talk to. “If I make a mistake on a deposit slip, I can call Rose at 8 o’clock at night and get it fixed,” she points out. Tori has already paid off her Oregon Coast Bank small business equipment loan and now appreciates being able to do much of her banking online with her laptop and iPhone.

All of us at Oregon Coast Bank admire Tori’s creativity and perseverance. Next time you’re driving through Hebo be sure to stop by Yellow Dog Espresso. Chances are there’ll be a line, but it’s well worth the wait.

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Grateful Bread Bakery

Grateful-Bread-Bakery

Don’t even attempt to read this on an empty stomach, because it’s virtually impossible to describe Pacific City’s renowned Grateful Bread Bakery without making you hungry.

It may not be quite as famous as Cape Kiwanda, but Grateful Bread Bakery has earned a loyal following of visitors and locals. The business first opened about 20 years ago. 10 years later, Robyn and Jay Barcroft purchased the company from its original owners. At the time, Robyn was managing a restaurant in Sunriver, although she had worked as a cook at Grateful Bread Bakery for four years. Jay is a local timber cutting contractor.

In the 10 years Robyn and Jay have owned the business, they’ve remodeled or expanded on an almost yearly basis. Today, about 30 percent of their revenue comes from direct sales of bakery items at the counter, through their drive-thru or to other restaurants. Breakfast and lunch business, as well as catering, accounts for the rest of their sales. The company employs eight, yet Robyn still routinely works 12-14 hour days.

It may come as a surprise, but the name Grateful Bread was originally just a play on words. Of course fans of the legendary band The Grateful Dead began flocking to the bakery, often leaving memorabilia. To commemorate the band and its devoted fans, Grateful Bread Bakery’s entire staff began wearing tie-dyed uniforms.

Many of Grateful Bread Bakery’s most popular items are the original recipes from 20 years ago, yet Robyn and her staff continue to add new items on a regular basis. Customer favorites include Grateful Grain Bread, Chocolate Chunk Cookies, Gingerbread Pancakes, Stuffed Focaccia, Vegetarian Lasagna and Corn & Cheese Chowder. The company’s 10 varieties of cookies have become so popular that they will soon be mass distributed under a Grateful Bread Bakery label. Currently under development are gluten-free bread and spelt (wheat-free) bread.

Grateful Bread Bakery believes in community involvement. The business often holds cookie promotions, with 100 percent of the proceeds going to local causes. Recipients have included Beaver Food Pantry, Pacific City Community Gardens and Nestucca High School. Unsold bread and pastries are donated to the Kiwanda Community Center daily.

Robyn and Jay had been longtime customers of Rose Wharton when she had managed the Cloverdale branch of another bank. When Rose became the manager of Oregon Coast Bank in Pacific City, Robyn and Jay decided to move all their accounts.

“We love dealing with Rose and her staff,” explains Robyn. “They’re just so friendly and we can call them any time, knowing that our questions will be answered.” Oregon Coast Bank has provided financing for Grateful Bread Bakery’s remodeling and expansion projects, as well as a line of credit, business checking and a money market. Robyn and Jay also use Oregon Coast Bank for their family accounts.

Besides being their bankers, Rose and her staff are also frequent customers of Grateful Bread Bakery. “I might be in the back baking, and all I have to hear is that laugh and I know that Rose is here,” remarks Robyn. “I think she’s as comfortable in our restaurant as I am in her bank.”

As you can probably tell, all of us at Oregon Coast Bank have become big fans of Grateful Bread Bakery. We’re also proud to be their bankers.

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Cape Kiwanda RV Resort

It’s been about 51 years since Don and Marjorie Johnston began building a small trailer park across the street from the beach at Pacific City’s Cape Kiwanda. Today you’d hardly recognize the place. In 1997 Don’s son Marty and his wife Terri joined the business as partners. Gradually through sweat equity, Marty and Terri became the majority shareholders of Cape Kiwanda RV Resort & Marketplace, dramatically improving and expanding the facilities in the process.

The company’s RV park, grocery store, fish market and gift store all used to share a somewhat decaying building that had originally been Pacific City Boatworks. But Marty and Terri had bigger plans. Together with Gordon Hood of GH Construction, they designed Cape Kiwanda Marketplace (pictured above) to house an upgraded grocery, fish market, deli, retail store and resort headquarters. Completed in 2005, the sprawling building also includes a large pool and spa as well as a workout room. In 2006 the old building was completely remodeled and made into Doryland Pizza, which has become an extremely popular restaurant for both locals and tourists.

The 10-acre resort now includes approximately 150 RV sites, about 40 of which are leased year round. In recent years, Marty and Terri have added 14 rustic cabins built of 4-inch solid wood. They’ve also added 14 cottages with amenities that rival hotels. A clubhouse, that holds about 60, is perfect for family reunions, and available for resort guests.

Despite the nation’s economic slowdown, business has remained strong at Cape Kiwanda RV Resort & Marketplace. The business recently completed its 51st straight year of increased sales. Apparently visitors are enjoying themselves, because more than half the company’s reservations come from return customers. In fact many Cape Kiwanda RV Resort guests choose to lengthen their stays after spending a few days.

The business has also been good for the community – during peak summer months it employs a staff of 50. Marty and Terri have co-chaired Pacific City’s Dory Days Parade Committee. In their spare time they enjoy dory boating at their home near Smith Park State Park near Redmond.

Building a business as diverse as Cape Kiwanda RV Resort and Marketplace is virtually impossible without a strong relationship with a bank, which is exactly how Marty and Terri describe their relationship with Oregon Coast Bank. “They believed in us,” explains Terri. “We feel fortunate to have a bank like that in town.” Oregon Coast Bank has provided loans, a revolving line of credit and a variety of business and personal accounts.

While growing up, Marty spent his summers fishing commercially in Pacific City and calls Rose Wharton (previous manager of Oregon Coast Bank’s Pacific City office) a lifelong friend. “No matter what we need, Rose takes care of it… you just can’t get that kind of service at the big chain banks,” points out Marty.

Perhaps the best part of working at a community bank is knowing that in a small way you’re helping your customers succeed. Through vision, persistence and a lot of hard work, Marty and Terri have done an incredible job with Cape Kiwanda RV Resort and Marketplace. We feel fortunate to be their bankers.

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Moment Surf Company

Ben-&-Jeffs-10-11

With a near constant line at their Pacific City restaurant’s takeout window and a thriving surf shop next door, it’s hard to imagine that one of the business philosophies of the owners is “keep it simple”. Yet simplicity may be why Ben & Jeff’s Burgers & Tacos and Moment Surf Company have become so popular.

Originally from the Portland area, Ben Johnson started coming to Pacific City in 1976. In 1989 he moved to the area fulltime and built houses for a living. Jeff Mollencop grew up in Virginia Beach and moved to Oregon in 1998. After several years of working in commercial real estate in Bend, Jeff moved to Pacific City and struck up a friendship with the builder of his new home – Ben.

With the housing market and construction slowing down, Ben was considering other business options. Jeff, who had pursued his devotion to surfing all around the world, had been planning to open a surf shop for years. He had even amassed hundreds of photos of surf shop layouts from as far away as Australia.

“Having survived the building process together, we knew we could get along,” laughs Jeff. “A good partnership is based on trust and integrity,” adds Ben. “We were friends before we became business partners and we’re even better friends today.”

Prior to opening, Ben and Jeff spent about four months constructing the businesses’ interiors. In the evenings, Jeff would often visit Ben and his wife Carol’s home, and together they’d test items for the restaurant’s menu. Simplicity and consistency were the goals. “Don’t over think it,” they’d often tell each other. Preferring fresh ingredients, they soon settled on a simple menu featuring burgers, tacos and fish & chips, with all sauces and salsas made fresh from original recipes.

Almost the entire interior of both the restaurant and surf shop was built using recycled lumber. “It was the right thing to do environmentally, but it also gave the building its character and saved us a lot of money on materials,” recalls Ben. In March of 2010, the building was complete and the businesses opened to the public. Both Moment Surf Company and Ben & Jeff’s Burgers & Tacos operated successfully from the outset. During the busy summer months, the restaurant will serve as many as 700 customers per day. “We geared the menu towards the masses,” explains Jeff. “It’s fresh, simple, nutritious food that you can get quickly and inexpensively.”

These days it’s not uncommon to see the ubiquitous Moment Surf Company logo – designed by Jeff – on hats, t-shirts and sweatshirts all over the state. The store carries a wide selection of surf, paddle, boogie and skim boards, as well as wetsuits and apparel, including many of the industry’s top brand names such as Roxy, Billabong, Reef, Quicksilver, Xcel, Volcom and O’Neill.

This year because of overwhelming demand, Moment Surf Company doubled its rental fleet. The store’s location on the beach at Cape Kiwanda is perfect. Customers can rent entire surf packages, change in private dressing rooms, and walk just 200 yards to the surf. “This beach is known for consistent, mellow waves, good for all abilities,” points out Jeff.

Despite having a staff of up to 10 in peak season, Ben and Jeff each often work as many as 80 hours a week. Their work ethic has been rewarded. Both businesses have proven successful and the partners have already paid off their initial investments. “About halfway through our first year, there was a moment when we both realized that all the hard work and planning was paying off,” remembers Ben.

The partners also talk enthusiastically about their banking relationship with Oregon Coast Bank. “Rose (manager of Oregon Coast Bank’s Pacific City office) gave me my first car loan many, many years ago,” explains Ben. “It’s nice to have bankers you know and trust; we’d never get that kind of service at a big chain bank.” Working as long hours as they do, the partners also appreciate being able to manage their accounts online using a laptop computer from their store or homes.

You may not find it in a management textbook, but “don’t over think it” seems to be working quite well as a business philosophy for Ben and Jeff. We admire their vision, we respect their work ethic, and we’re proud to be their bankers.

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Chesters Hometown Market

Chesters-Hometown-Market

If you ever set out from John Day to Pacific City, give yourself over six hours – it’s more than a 300 mile trip.  But that’s exactly what Bob and Thad Cowan Thompson do practically every week.

Bob started in the grocery business more than 28 years ago, in his words “working his way up from the bottom” at Chester’s Thriftway in John Day.  In 2000 he was able to buy the store from the family that founded it.  These days Bob’s son Thad is the store’s manager.  In March of 2012 Bob purchased Pacific City’s longtime grocery store, renaming it Chester’s Hometown Market.  Although they remain separate businesses, the two stores operate as mirror images, both with an emphasis on community involvement and local employment.

Operating under various ownership groups for more than 30 years, the Pacific City market tended to serve as a convenience store.  Local residents would drive 20-25 miles to either Tillamook or Lincoln City to do their weekly shopping.  Bob and Thad were committed to changing that fact and to do so they expanded the inventory, brought in fresher offerings and lowered every day prices.  It took a few months for locals to notice the difference, but soon the store was receiving positive comments on a daily basis and sales had increased by more than 25 percent (which is remarkable considering the lower prices).
“Things have really changed here,” comments Yazminn Thompson, the store’s manager who shares a last name with Bob and Thad but is not related.  “Extra service is the key to happy customers – we have one lady who we special order a case of a particular dog food for every two weeks.”

Stroll through the aisles of the 8,000 square foot store and the first thing that you’ll notice is that most customers are greeted by name.  Socializing seems to go hand-in-hand with the shopping, and in Yazminn’s words – “the best part of working here is being able to see people you know and care for.”
Chester’s Hometown Market employs 16, eight of whom are full time.  Perhaps the most familiar is Nadine Anderson, who’s been a checker at the market for more than 27 years.  Gesela Marin, who serves as both the butcher and fresh supervisor, has been at the store for over 10 years.  Yazminn, who was promoted to manager about five months ago, has lived in Pacific City for three years and appreciates the opportunity “for a single mom to be able to be general manager of a store”.  Like many of its employees and the store itself, Yazminn is very involved in the local community.  She now coaches the high school’s girls basketball team.  In fact, pictures of all of Nestucca High School’s athletic teams are proudly displayed in season in the store.

Running a grocery store requires considerable interaction with a bank and Bob, Thad and Yazminn have very positive things to say about Oregon Coast Bank.  “Everyone is so nice, it’s just such a pleasure doing business with them,” explains Yazminn.

All of us at Oregon Coast Bank are elated that our local Pacific City grocery store remains in such capable hands.  After all, we’re not just their bankers, we’re their customers, too.

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